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Reblogged from ourpresidents  134 notes
ourpresidents:

On this day, October 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Marshall was the first African American SCOTUS Justice.
He also did some pretty cool stuff before that:
ourpresidents:

Mr. Civil Rights
Thurgood Marshall convinced the Supreme Court that school segregation was unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. 
As legal counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Marshall represented civil rights plaintiffs all over the south and argued more than 30 such cases before the Supreme Court.  He won all but five and earned the nickname, Mr. Civil Rights.
In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named him to the U.S. Court of the Appeals for the Second District. In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson appointed Marshall U.S. Solicitor General, the third highest post in the Department of Justice.
Two years later, on June 13, 1967, LBJ nominated Marshall to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court where he served for 24 years.
Thurgood Marshall’s nomination by LBJ made him the first African American Supreme Court Justice, but it also followed a long and distinguished career as a civil rights lawyer who successfully fought inequality and discrimination.
Pictured here are Marshall and LBJ outside of the White House.  7/9/65
-from the LBJ Library

ourpresidents:

On this day, October 2, 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Marshall was the first African American SCOTUS Justice.

He also did some pretty cool stuff before that:

ourpresidents:

Mr. Civil Rights

Thurgood Marshall convinced the Supreme Court that school segregation was unconstitutional in Brown v. Board of Education

As legal counsel for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Marshall represented civil rights plaintiffs all over the south and argued more than 30 such cases before the Supreme Court.  He won all but five and earned the nickname, Mr. Civil Rights.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named him to the U.S. Court of the Appeals for the Second District. In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson appointed Marshall U.S. Solicitor General, the third highest post in the Department of Justice.

Two years later, on June 13, 1967, LBJ nominated Marshall to be Associate Justice of the Supreme Court where he served for 24 years.

Thurgood Marshall’s nomination by LBJ made him the first African American Supreme Court Justice, but it also followed a long and distinguished career as a civil rights lawyer who successfully fought inequality and discrimination.

Pictured here are Marshall and LBJ outside of the White House.  7/9/65

-from the LBJ Library